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Pritchett talks superintendent search

By Benjamin Herold on Jan 30, 2012 01:01 PM
Photo: Harvey Finkle

 School Refom Commissioner Wendell Pritchett is chairing the superintendent search committee.

by Benjamin Herold
for the Notebook and WHYY/NewsWorks
 

The School Reform Commission intends to “cast a wide net” in order to snag the right superintendent for Philadelphia.

But in a wide-ranging interview about the search process, commissioner and search committee chairman Wendell Pritchett was clear that he is looking for candidates who will embrace the existing District initiatives – Renaissance Schools, the facilities master plan, and the Great Schools Compact – that have already begun reshaping the way public education happens in the city.

“We have lots of different kinds of schools. That’s the world we live in,” said Pritchett. “And so the next superintendent is going to have to…help us manage, understand, and move forward with a portfolio of schools.”

Listen to Wendell Pritchett discuss the superintendent search on WHYY Radio.

This week, the search committee will kick off the public engagement portion of its effort. At a series of community forums convened by the United Way and facilitated by the Penn Project for Civic Engagement, the committee hopes to get feedback – and names of potential candidates – from parents, students, teachers, business leaders, and others.

“I’m begging [for names],” said Pritchett. “We need to…get a diverse pool so that we can find the best person.”

The first meeting is Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at Mastery-Simon Gratz High. (Full schedule of the forums.)

In advance of the forums, Pritchett sat down with Notebook/Newsworks reporter Benjamin Herold to talk more about the search. The interview occurred January 25 at Rutgers-Camden University, where he is chancellor.

Despite the District’s budget crisis, Pritchett was upbeat that the right candidate will eventually materialize.

“This is an opportunity to have a gigantic impact,” he said. “I’m confident we’re going to find good people because I think they’re going to want that challenge.”

Notebook/Newsworks readers are encouraged to weigh in with their suggestions on possible candidates.

And an edited transcript of the full interview with Pritchett follows.


Herold: So you’ve started the search.

Pritchett: We have.

Herold: Where are you in the process right now?

Pritchett: We’re in the process of drafting a draft job description, understanding that it will change over the process. We have begun the process of soliciting recommendations of candidates, and we’ve begun the process of soliciting ideas for who else we should be talking to to get recommendations for candidates. And most importantly we’ve begun the process of community engagement.

Herold: How do you sell this position?

Pritchett: This is an opportunity to have a gigantic impact…

I’m confident we’re going to find good people because I think they’re going to want that challenge.

Herold: Where are you looking to find candidates?

Pritchett: We’re doing a very robust community engagement process that’s going to invite lots of people from all different walks of life. We’re going to be engaging deeply with the parent community. We’re going to be engaging with student leaders and students in general. We’re going to be engaging with the business community.

Herold: So you’re hoping students and parents will suggest names?

Pritchett: Yes. I’m begging them. We need to cast a wide net and get a diverse pool so that we can find the best person. Everybody that I meet that I talk to about this, I ask who do you think individually would be a good person for the job.

Herold: Are their specific organizations that you or other members of the search committee have already reached out to for recommendations?

Pritchett: Not me personally. I have asked the search committee to do that, but I haven’t gotten a report in the last couple of days about what they’re doing, so I can't give you an up-to-date list of who we have reached out to.

Herold: What about the Broad Foundation? They’re one of the most prominent and controversial providers of superintendents to urban districts. Is that a resource that you will try to tap?

Pritchett: We’re going to tap every resource we can think of. We’ve been encouraged to do that, and I expect that we will, yes.

Herold: What’s your take on the merits of Broad-trained candidates in other districts?

Pritchett: I don’t have enough knowledge to express an opinion on that. I hope to at some point relatively soon have enough information that I can answer that question, but I don’t yet.

Herold: Given the criteria that the SRC has laid out, there’s been a lot of speculation that you’re going to consider outside of the box candidates, perhaps someone from the private sector who might not have been trained specifically to be a superintendent. Talk to me about the pros and cons of casting the net that wide.

Pritchett: We did agree that we’re going to take a very broad approach to candidates, and we’re looking for nominations from all walks of life. I think that’s a good way to start. I do think that having a deep understanding of the educational mission of public education is crucial to success on this job…

We have not closed the door to any types of candidates.

Herold: Talk to me about how you and your fellow commissioners see that role of public education. Given the flux in the system right now, what does that mean to you?

Pritchett: Public education is crucial to the success of the city. We have a long history in Philadelphia of innovation in public education, meaning schooling that is paid for by tax dollars…I think we are clear that public education, defined as I just did, is crucial. And that the community support for publicly funded education is something that we need the new superintendent to be able to rouse.

Herold: That includes charter schools.

Pritchett: The public pays for them. They’re public schools.

Herold: How do you see that balance between how charters and the District deliver education and education services shifting, and how do you want your new superintendent to address that balance moving forward?

Pritchett: I’m not going to give a full answer because I think the commission and the chair are still working on that question. However, what I will say…is that we acknowledge that we have a portfolio, meaning that we have a lot of different kinds of schools. We have them. The state government and the city government have asked us to manage a portfolio. It exists. Many of our parents desire to have that portfolio, they have sent their kids to those schools. So it is clear that the next superintendent is going to need to be able to organize thoughtfully, get resources, manage, and hold accountable all of those different kinds of schools. That’s the world we live in.

We could have a philosophical conversation about is that where we should be. I find that not really productive, because that’s where we are. And so the next superintendent is going to have to live in that world. We’re going to need someone who can…help us manage, understand and move forward with a portfolio of schools.

Herold: So there’s a series of initiatives currently underway in the District related to that portfolio model. There’s the Renaissance Schools initiative, there’s the facilities master plan, there’s the Great Schools Compact. Is it safe to assume that the search committee and SRC are looking for candidates who are going to embrace those initiatives and look to continue them in some form?

Pritchett: Yes. I gave a lot of long answers, so how about a short one? Yes.

Herold: How is the budget crisis going to impact your search?

Pritchett: I don’t know, is the short answer. I certainly think that candidates who will be looking at the job will be asking lots of questions about it, so that’s one way it will affect us. The reality is that we’re in a dynamic process with regard to the budget, and there are a lot of things that are unresolved. At the same time…It’s not like we’re special. All across the country, school districts are facing the same challenges we have. So yes, it will have an impact. But all of these other places have leaders, and I’m confident we’ll get one, too.

Herold: The SRC has talked about needing to stabilize the District over the next six months. Where are you trying to get the School District in order to attract the type of candidate you want?

Pritchett: I think Commissioners Ramos and Houstoun said it well. We want to have a plan for a sustainable financial model. It doesn’t mean we’re going to have it completely implemented before we have a new superintendent. The reality is that the budget is a dynamic process, and we will be getting to engage with the state government and the city government soon about next year, and we don’t know where that’s going to stand. So the idea that we’re going to have complete clarity is not realistic. But we want to have a process moving towards a sustainable budget model that will create stability for the school district. That’s what we’re trying to do.

Herold: Can you talk a little bit about the decision to shake things up and go with a Chief Recovery Officer during this interim period while the search is going on?

Pritchett: I really think that’s an appropriate question for the chair. But I will say that we believe it’s important to get closer to a plan for fiscal stability so that the next superintendent will be able to be successful in educating children.

Herold: So what Mr. Knudsen is going to be asked to do over the next six months could look very different than what a long-term superintendent is going to be asked to do?

Pritchett: Yes, I think that’s a fair statement.

Herold: At its base, the District is about teaching and learning in the classroom. Where do you want to see the next superintendent take the District on that front?

Pritchett: Well, where we want to see the District go is educational achievement for every child in the School District, no matter where they stand right now and no matter what school that they’re in….

Personally, I think that requires a person who can develop a diverse array of approaches to education, because our children are in different places….

We have budget challenges, we have government affairs challenges, we have management challenges. But if we’re not focused fundamentally on that issue, how do we help all children achieve, we’re not going to make the progress that we need.

We could have a highly functioning and efficient district which produces terrible outcomes for children. I don’t want that. What we want is a district that produces terrific outcomes for children. If that’s happening and there’s a lot of messiness around everything else, at the end I’ll be able to sleep all right with that.

Herold: Can a superintendent who’s not familiar with education have that focus on the classroom?

Pritchett: There are lots of people who are familiar with education who weren’t either teachers or have a Ph.D. in education…We’ve seen success in places for people without those specific requirements.

Now let me say right now that I think that having teaching experience is extremely important and having a Ph.D. in education or a related field would be a useful thing. But I think at this point we should take an open mind as to who the potential candidates are and look at them as individuals, not have boxes to check off.

Herold: Give me an example of what you mean by that.

Pritchett: There are business leaders who have been deeply involved in education through their role as advocates, through their role as administrators. There are government leaders who have been deeply involved in education through their role as legislators and policymakers. There are many ways to approach the question of leadership in public education. And there are many people who have been deeply engaged in that question of what is high quality public education without having specific boxes that they’ve checked off.

Herold: Right now the operating premise is low-performing schools have to earn the right to autonomy. But there’s been a lot of talk of decentralization and increased autonomy for schools. Does this signal a switch?

Pritchett: That’s something that the commissioners along with the senior leaders of the School District have been discussing. I don’t think I have an answer for it…

I personally don’t have an opinion on exactly what decentralization would mean. I think we’re going to need the next superintendent to help us think that through, but we need lots of other people to help us think that through. So again, I welcome people’s thoughts about what exactly that means and how it would work.

Herold: What have you heard from teachers so far?

Pritchett: Personally, not much. I hope and encourage our teachers to engage in the community process.…I’d love to hear more.

Herold: Why were there no educators on the search committee?

Pritchett: There are many educators on the search committee, including myself.

Herold: Philadelphia public school teachers.

Pritchett: The labor-management issues surrounding the search would make that very complicated.

Herold: How important is to have someone who knows Philadelphia and all of its quirks?

Pritchett: I personally think it’s pretty important to have someone who has some knowledge about the city of Philadelphia. Every city is different, and in Philadelphia, we have a lot of idiosyncrasies…Having some understanding of that is I think going to be very important.

Herold: What do you want to let people know about what’s going to happen at the forums?

Pritchett: They will be mostly listening sessions…In general, it will be listening, what does the community, different stakeholders, what do they think we should be looking for in a superintendent, and just as importantly what do they think we should be doing to organize the leadership to produce high quality outcomes for every child. Those two things are related.

We hope that we will have full engagement of the community, because this is very important.

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Comments (37)

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on January 30, 2012 3:05 pm

Sounds like promoter of same o' Ackerman crap to me. Nutter...step in and help! PLEASE!!!! END THE SRC!!!!!!!!!!!

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on January 30, 2012 3:13 pm

Well, where we want to see the District go is educational achievement for every child in the School District, no matter where they stand right now and no matter what school that they’re in….

Personally, I think that requires a person who can develop a diverse array of approaches to education, because our children are in different places….>

In that case, Wendell, you need to bring real classroom teachers into the game and not make measly excuses for not doing so. Labor issues aren't that complicated. What a weak excuse.

Submitted by tom-104 on January 30, 2012 3:57 pm

When asked about Ackerman Pritchett recites the mantra of all levels of government: "We must look forward, not back."

We therefore have an economic crisis brought on by the greed and mismanagement of the banking community (go to billmoyers.com and view the videos to see why we are in the mess we are in, but not only is no one fired or jailed for the disaster, but they get huge bonuses), but we are not supposed to look back to see what happened.

We have destroyed Iraq, have been in Afghanistan for ten years with little to show for it, have alienated much of the world through military interventions into their affairs, but we are not supposed to look back at the lives lost and the human suffering we have created!

In Philadelphia we stubble from one budget crisis to the next, from one Superintendent to the next, but we are not supposed to look back to learn anything from this history. Those who do not want to look back have something to hide!

Submitted by John M. (not verified) on January 30, 2012 6:17 pm

Tom 104---------Be careful the folks who run this site, will start scolding you for being irresponsible and worse. No, this guy sounds like an apologist but what else is new?

Submitted by tom-104 on January 30, 2012 7:39 pm

I have never seen the staff of the Notebook censor someone for giving a strongly held opinion. They occasionally reprimand people for violating their Terms of Service when someone uses profanity or abusive language. I can be very passionate about my opinions, but I do not have to be abusive to express them. Even in my disagreement with Pritchett it was not a personal attack on him, I am criticizing the corporate mentally which now dominates the Administration of the School District.

Every day I ask myself where would we be without the Notebook. It is the one place that teachers and parents can voice their opinions in a forthright way without censorship or spin to distort what we are saying.

Submitted by Bill N. (not verified) on January 30, 2012 7:24 pm

The facts speak differently and I don't have a dog in this fight.

Submitted by TAS (not verified) on January 30, 2012 6:53 pm

Well, it looks like the district is going to find a superintendent who is going to continue us down this destructive and devastating path that will lead to the complete privatization of education in Philadelphia.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on January 30, 2012 6:22 pm

Why no mention of how they are planning to prevent mass layoffs? Ah yes, the drama and the same crazed nonsense will begin after Feb 20th when we find out what schools are slated to become charter schools.

Submitted by Bill N. (not verified) on January 30, 2012 8:22 pm

Obviously, they already knew exactly who was getting what long ago. Yes, nothing has changed except the faces of the SRC. And the beat goes on.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on January 31, 2012 8:13 pm

They don't plan to prevent mass layoffs. It isn't in their best interest. The last time anyone in charge of this district actually thought about the schools or children they are in charge of must have been long before I started working here.

Submitted by Bill N. (not verified) on January 30, 2012 9:38 pm

Shock and Awe--101--- A manufactured crisis by Corbett. Emergency action is needed--Bring in the charters in a massive way, ending the SD, The inner city kids' lives, the union, the democratic party in Phila., all in 1 grand swoop.

We need to be ready to fight back in an equally big way through masses of people organized and hostile just as others have posted.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on January 31, 2012 1:03 pm

The last thing we need is another "superintendent " from the broad foundation.

Submitted by Rob (not verified) on January 30, 2012 10:18 pm

He sound like a politician. There is nothing I learned in this interview and I think a lot of questions he should have been able to answer given his months in this role. he doesn't exactly exude confidence. I would expect someone who is serious about Ed policy to know about Broad. Also what would be the problem of having teachers have a place at the table when it comes to the future of public education in Philadelphia

Submitted by Bill N. (not verified) on January 30, 2012 10:28 pm

Well, teachers know more about educating kids than anybody on the SRC--case closed !

Submitted by EILEEN DIFRANCO (not verified) on January 31, 2012 1:37 pm

I would advise everyone, including Mr. Prichette, to read the Darling-Hammond piece from "The Nation" entitled, "How Congress is Redlining Our Schools.

Submitted by J.Kenedy (not verified) on January 31, 2012 2:42 pm

THE SRC COULDN'T CARE LESS ABOUT Darling--Hammond. Their agenda is clear--follow the script st out by Corbett etal and Obama to a lesser degree. Give the schools to corporations so the rich can abuse the poor one more time and couch it all under the pretext of School Reform. This will be the final nail in the coffin of the inner cities if they are allowed to do it. Obama is a disgrace to care nothing about people who thought he was the real deal. He's George Bush with a better grasp of the King's English.

Submitted by tom-104 on January 31, 2012 3:11 pm

The link for Darling-Hammond's article in The Nation is here (make sure you read both pages):

http://www.thenation.com/article/165575/why-congress-redlining-our-schools

It was reprinted in the Washington Post here:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/post/darling-hammond-wh...

Regularly check the Post Education columnist who posted this, Valarie Strauss. She is excellent and understands the battle we are in.

Today she posts a letter by Diane Ravitch. "Does Obama understand Race to the Top? — Ravitch" is at:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/post/does-obama-underst...

Submitted by Eileen DiFranco (not verified) on January 31, 2012 10:05 pm

I was talking to one of my sources. I asked why there were no parents on the newly created advisory board. Apparently, Prichette feels that parents already voted with their feet by leaving. What he doesn't realize that parents were leaving the schools that the SD, the city, and the state have red lined. No safety b/c the NTA's are gone. No art, no music, no librarian, the possibility of no spring sports and now no nurses. It is not surprising that people left when the rug got pulled out from under their feet. And Prichett, who acted disrespectfully at the last SRC meeting, is acting disrespectfully towards the parents of Phila. by not including them in the advisory board. He assumes that he knows what they are thinking without asking. He goes on about a "portfolio" of schools, as if our children were ticker tape at the stock market. My idea of a "reconstituted" school is one where the basics have been restored: competent leadership, NTA's, lunch room monitors, reading specialists, art, music teachers, librarians, and nurses. Why give the store away to people making more money than the superintendent. But of course, this is what it is all about. Making money, not children.

Submitted by William T. (not verified) on February 1, 2012 7:20 am

Exactly--Follow the money UNLESS we stop it..Blatant corruption right in our face and Jordan does nothing, Nutter does nothing and here it comes, Obama does nothing. If the workers in Wisconsin lose, the labor movement in the US is DONE--mark it down. Did I say, Jordan just sits, shocked just shocked.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on January 31, 2012 1:54 pm

All opponents of "shock and awe":
Meet at 440 tomorrow (Wednesday) at 4pm and every Wednesday
Nurses link staff cuts to privatization trend
This battle will be long. We are in this until the trend reverses.
We do not intend to go down without a fight.
Spread the word.
See you there.

Submitted by J.Kenedy (not verified) on January 31, 2012 2:22 pm

Yes, it is all tied together like one big, ugly circle. We need to be more proactive, organized, HOSTILE and unrelenting because they are, unless we should take the high road which is code for toast. Seriously, enough praying, waiting, praying, singing and praying-----Time to ACT WITH MALICE.

Submitted by EILEEN DIFRANCO (not verified) on January 31, 2012 2:55 pm

Never with malice. With facts. Facts will always supersede malice. Malice is Newt and Co.

Submitted by William T. (not verified) on January 31, 2012 9:23 pm

I shall be there. Bet Jordan isn't !! He's far too busy being shocked to act.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on January 31, 2012 9:49 pm

I want to ask him when the union constitution gave the Executive Board the right to name him President for the next four years without an election. We are losing democracy in every level of this country including the union!

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on January 31, 2012 9:51 pm

I want to ask him when the union constitution gave the Executive Board the right to name him President for the next four years without an election. We are losing democracy in every level of this country including the union!

Submitted by William T. (not verified) on January 31, 2012 9:46 pm

Funny you mentioned that. I called the union and he wouldn't take my call. I understand they were inundated with calls to that effect. Gee, I wonder why? If he doesn't get off his butt, there won't be any union left.

Submitted by William T. (not verified) on January 31, 2012 3:56 pm

ALWAYS with malice and facts when dealing with bigots etc. You might want to check out the history of the world. Peace through strength has always been the motto of the U.S. though it hurts some folks' feelings to hear that. Do you think Newt cares what you think if he knows malice is off the table???? Please !! I hope you don't teach history.

Submitted by Eileen DiFranco (not verified) on January 31, 2012 10:55 pm

There is a difference between malice for malice sake and speaking the truth which sometimes makes people feel as if you are acting with malice and violence. When I shout out "Shame on you, SRC, Mayor Nutter, Governor Corbett" at our weekly rallies at 440, I am not speaking with malice. I am speaking the truth. They should be ashamed for what they have done. I may be construed as acting with malice.I am not being malicious. Malice connotes evil intentions. I have no evil intentions.

Submitted by William T. (not verified) on January 31, 2012 10:19 pm

Oh, Please----Get over yourself. You'll still be OK if you get mad. Owning your feelings is healthy. It doesn't make you less of a good person.

Submitted by Taxpayer (not verified) on February 1, 2012 11:03 am

Looks like the blind leading the blind. We need to privatize the entire system and let the free market and capitalism figure it out. And no, not just like the banks. They were supposed to fail. It was the government backstop that encouraged them to act recklessly. And, true to form, the largest recipient of political contributions from Wall Street in history, Barrack Obama, had them bailed out.

Submitted by William T. (not verified) on February 1, 2012 3:43 pm

A free for all and guess who will be left behind? The last thing needed is Privatization. The country needs to deal with the poverty in the inner cities not just write them off as collateral damage. I agree--Obama has been a massive failure for the people who elected him.

Submitted by tom-104 on February 2, 2012 9:48 am

Pritchett does not rule out appointing someone from the Broad Foundations Superintendent's Academy in the interview:
***************
"Herold: What about the Broad Foundation? They’re one of the most prominent and controversial providers of superintendents to urban districts. Is that a resource that you will try to tap?

Pritchett: We’re going to tap every resource we can think of. We’ve been encouraged to do that, and I expect that we will, yes.

Herold: What’s your take on the merits of Broad-trained candidates in other districts?

Pritchett: I don’t have enough knowledge to express an opinion on that. I hope to at some point relatively soon have enough information that I can answer that question, but I don’t yet.

****************************
Note that Pritchett does not rule out one of the Superintendents trained by the Broad Foundation, who have been wreaking havoc all over the country, being the new Superintendent in Philadelphia.

We have already experienced a Broad Foundation Superintendent with Arlene Ackerman. This is a repost of an earlier post that shows Ackerman was carrying out the privatizing agenda of The Broad Foundation while she was Superintendent in Philadelphia:

Ackerman started serving on the Board of Directors of the Broad Foundation on March 19, 2009, while she was Superintendent of Philadelphia public schools. Other members included Joel Klein, chancellor of NYC schools (who went on the join Rupert Murdock's News Corporation as executive vice president) and Michelle Rhee, former chancellor of DC public schools. (See this PDF for reference http://tinyurl.com/89sfrzv). Ackerman's name was dropped from the Board of Directors on their website this past summer when the scandal over her dismissal erupted.

For more information on the Broad Foundation see this fact sheet from Parents Across America: http://tinyurl.com/3ltddl6

These two paragraphs in regards to the past several years in Philadelphia public schools should be noted from the section “How the Broad Foundation affects public school families” from the PAA article linked above:

“Broad and his foundation believe that public schools should be run like a business. One of the tenets of his philosophy is to produce system change by “investing in a disruptive force.” Continual reorganizations, firings of staff, and experimentation to create chaos or “churn” is believed to be productive and beneficial, as it weakens the ability of communities to resist change.”

“A hallmark of the Broad-style leadership is closing existing schools rather than attempting to improve them, increasing class size, opening charter schools, imposing high-stakes test-based accountability systems on teachers and students, and implementing of pay for performance schemes. The brusque and often punitive management style of Broad-trained leaders has frequently alienated parents and teachers and sparked protests.”

Ackerman was bought out of her contract in San Francisco in mid-2006 after six years as Superintendent. http://tinyurl.com/77kkh8p. During the period after she left San Francisco she was the first Superintendent-in-residence for the Broad Foundation’s Superintendent’s Academy in 2007-2008.
http://tinyurl.com/84hdtq7 (Do a search in the PDF for “Ackerman”.)

When the scandal over which charter provider should take over Martin Luther King broke, Mayor Nutter appointed Chief Integrity Officer Joan Markman to do an investigation. (The full report is at http://tinyurl.com/78g9ghv) In the report, there are two separate instances where it states Ackerman was being “shadowed” by trainees from the Broad Foundation’s Superintendent’s Academy. (Do a search for “Broad Superintendent Academy” in the PDF.)

This raises several questions. Was Ackerman using her position as Superintendent of Philadelphia public schools to have an additional source of income from the Broad Academy? Is this legal? Who in the District and in city government knew of her affiliation with the Broad Foundation? Given that the Broad Foundation is one of the leading national organizations promoting the privitization of public schools, is this affiliation why she was appointed Superintendent of Philadelphia public Schools despite her past history?

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on February 2, 2012 11:55 am

I have to assume you are playing master of the obvious for affect. Everybody who can google knew who she was LONG ago and she was still hired. She did exactly what she was hired to do. Where's the outrage from the PFT and the other unions???? Jordan remains shocked, just shocked !!

Submitted by tom-104 on February 2, 2012 1:52 pm

No, I am urging people to educate themselves about the Broad Foundation, the Gates Foundation and the Walton Family Foundation. Since we are in the economic crisis, people must be familiar with the privatizers tactics and agenda. Much of what they are doing is being done by stealth until it is too late for the districts where they operate. We have the means to get that information on the internet.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on February 3, 2012 1:13 pm

Stealth??????? Where???? It's blatant disregard for all things moral without even a hint of hiding anything so where's the stealth?? Do we have to be run over by a truck before we see and internalize this open abuse??

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Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on September 2, 2014 11:48 pm

Staff presented amendments, some users say they occasionally violate the terms of service. If someone uses bad language or insulting language, I like to express their views, but I did not casually express my criticism is now management methods lack a spirit of enterprise.

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