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District to hold public hearings on school closings

By Wendy Harris on Feb 8, 2013 01:28 PM

The School Reform Commission will hold a series of public hearings over three days to hear testimony on the proposed school closures before the commission votes March 7. The meetings will take place Feb. 21, Feb. 22 and Feb. 23. All hearings will be held in the auditorium at the School District of Philadelphia headquarters, 440 N. Broad St., and will be divided up according to District planning area.

Those who want to testify must pre-register by calling the Office of Parent, Community & Family Engagement at 215-400-4180. Pre-registration runs from 9 a.m. Feb. 19 through noon Feb. 21. No more than 10 speakers will be permitted to testify about each school that is slated to close, and the guidelines as outlined in the District’s speaker policy for SRC public meetings will apply to the hearings.

The dates and times of the hearings are listed below:

Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013  
Planning Area Time
Northcentral (west of Broad St.)    6-7 p.m.
Northcentral (east of Broad St.) 7-7:45 p.m.
Northwest (high schools) 7:45-8:15 p.m.
Northwest (elementary / middle) 8:15-8:45 p.m
Southwest 8:45-9:30 p.m.
West   9:30-10 p.m.
Southcentral 10-10:25 p.m.
Northeast   10:25-10:35 p.m.
   
Friday, Feb. 22, 2013  
Planning Area   Time
Northcentral (west of Broad St.)                                        8:30-10:30 a.m.
Northcentral (east of Broad St.) 10:30 a.m.-noon
Northwest (high schools)    1-2 p.m.
Northwest (elementary/middle) 2-3 p.m.
Southwest 3-4:45 p.m.
West    4:45-5:45 p.m.
Southcentral    5:45-6:35 p.m.
Northeast   6:35-6:50 p.m.
   
Saturday, Feb. 23, 2013  
Planning Area Time
Northeast 8:30-8:45 a.m.
Southcentral      8:45-9:30 a.m.
West 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Southwest 10:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Northwest (high schools)     1-2 p.m.
Northwest (elementary/middle)   2-3 p.m.
Northcentral (east of Broad St.)          3-4:30 p.m.
Northcentral(west of Broad St.)        4:30-6:30 p.m.

 

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Comments (12)

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on February 8, 2013 2:38 pm
The SD, apparently, was shamed into restoring some of the February meetings at night next week. Three are on the same day. Fulton's is from 9-10-30 AM. Maybe teachers will be given extra preps to get there, but I doubt it. Working parents are obviously shut out. They have been cut from two hours to one and a half. (Has Overbrook's been cancelled?) Since two of the SRC members--Pritchett and Houston--have already said they will not vote for the moratorium, the first question should be: Why are we here? Lisa Haver
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on February 8, 2013 7:54 pm
Hi Lisa, Why would they cancel Overbrook's meeting? What have you heard that makes you ask that? (I'm from the Overbrook Elementary community). Thanks.
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on February 10, 2013 8:09 am
I wrote it as a question because I heard from someone I thought would know, but I had not see an official notification yet. If you're there, you would know. Thanks. Lisa
Submitted by JUDITH ROBINSON (not verified) on February 8, 2013 4:37 pm
WHO are the people sitting at the table making these decision ? ! Where is it stated RE; Houston &Prichett?
Submitted by fight the power (not verified) on February 9, 2013 1:22 am
The Allegory of the Farm And now, I said, let me show in a figure how far our nature is enlightened or unenlightened: --Behold!Sheep scattered on a barn, or maybe cows, no, better yet crabs in a barrel; what ever the critter you get the point; dumb, harmful really just to their own kind, and only really are necessary to provide the raw material goods they produce, yet in and of themselves they are just animals. The old farmer had done most of the sheering, and kept the sheep in their place properly disposing of them when they were of no more value. There was never a need to feed them that well, or provide them with adequate grazing pastures, cause the sheep only knew of what they had. However, some savvy young and wealthy farmers got smart and came to the old farmer with a plan to lease some of the sheep from him, for they found a way to garner wool, or fleece the masses of sheep cheaper and more efficiently than the old farmer could. It would cut down the old farmers cost to feed the sheep, and really the farmer was just getting to old to be running after those sheep anyway. So, the savvy young wealthy farmers lured those better sheep away with the promise of greener pastures, and made it more glamorous like all entities do by touting its virtues and limiting accessibility to it, for only a few sheep were chosen every so often with the promise of greener pastures. Well, what poor old sheep could refuse the prospects of greener pastures? Although shepherds from the northern lands of Cambridge had come and found that the grass really isn’t at all greener, than the old farmers pastures. However, sheep don’t read, especially reports in peer reviewed shepherds journals, so the sheep remained dumb and hopeful that they would one day graze on lush grass beside the still waters. Well, one day the old farmer, snuck out with his new earnings from the savvy young farmers and lost all his money gambling in a game called “swaps”, and didn’t even have enough money to tend to his old sheep anymore. Well, the man who owned the land, a shrewd land owner like most in his profession had been waiting for an opportunity like this, and he knew this was his lucky break. He saw how easy it was for those young savvy farmers to take the sheep off the old farmers hands and how dumb those sheep were to think there was such thing for them as greener pastures; for the land owner owned all the land and knew, the truly green pastures and still waters weren’t ever for sheep to occupy. But the landowner said to himself; now, I could give the old farmer the money to hold his sheep over till he gets back on his feet, or I can let him starve, make him sell cheap and start divvying up his farm land and make myself and my farming partners rich. After all what did God make sheep for but to get fleeced, and he created those like the land owner to always live upon the greenest pastures. He knew there was no sense in that old drunk farmer keeping all those sheep tied to himself. Besides, he wasn’t taking that good care of them anyway. So the land owner withheld any help to that old farmer. The old farmer figured he was never a good farmer anyway. He might as well sell all these remaining sheep and retire to the rolling hills of Wynnefield which lay at the south gate of the land of greener pastures and still waters. These of the greenest pastures were the lands of Radnor and Merion where all the land owners and their savvy farmer friends and family lived. Now the old farmer was weak and didn’t have to much energy to corral all those sheep. As a matter of fact, all of those years as a sheep farmer, and being a sheep himself, he came to distain the very smell of them and didn’t want much else to do with sheep anymore. So, he called an old shepherd, a great sheep Herder from Prince Georges County to come round up the remainder of his sheep so he could go and sell those remaining to his land owner and retire. Now the shepherd from Maryland was efficient and had a “Master Plan” for closing up the old stables and rounding up the sheep for the farmer so they could be sold to the land owner. Soon, he thought; the new farmers will come and divvy up all the remaining sheep in the few remaining stables and sheer them and feed them for less money at a profit. Now, one might ask; what happened to all those sheep so long ago who left the fold, who thought the grass was greener? Well, the newly purchased sheep joined them, crowded the stables once again, and now they’re all getting fed half the rations, and some must walk twice the distance to get fed. The old farmer retired and thanked God he never had to smell the scent of sheep again. The savvy young farmers consolidated and made one great stable and lowered their sheep provisions cost even further, and the land owner remains perched in the green green pastures keeping an eye out for any tragedy he might turn a profit on. In the end all things were as they always were. Landowners continue to buy and sell the land, farmers continue to reap from it, and the sheep? Well, we all know sheep are born to be fleeced.
Submitted by Rich Migliore (not verified) on February 9, 2013 8:39 am
Gotta give you props on this one!
Submitted by g (not verified) on February 10, 2013 1:10 pm
Well said!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Submitted by Ms.Cheng (not verified) on February 10, 2013 2:38 pm
So like are the sheep the taxpayers? If the taxpayers aren't the sheep, are they the grass? Is money the grass? The herders, the ones with all the professional expertise or all the grass? How did God get into the picture? Like who is he, really? In actuality, someone (possibly God or the taxpayer) is giving the herders (money, maybe nectar) to convert/transform the sheep, reduce their numbers, but the herders want to instead multiply these sheep... I think the better fit story is one out of a Stephen King novel, of a little town that time forgot...
Submitted by fight the power (not verified) on February 9, 2013 1:58 am
The Allegory of the Farm And now, I said, let me show in a figure how far our nature is enlightened or unenlightened: --Behold!Sheep scattered on a barn, or maybe cows, no, better yet crabs in a barrel; what ever the critter you get the point; dumb, harmful really just to their own kind, and only really are necessary to provide the raw material goods they produce, yet in and of themselves they are just animals. The old farmer had done most of the sheering, and kept the sheep in their place properly disposing of them when they were of no more value. There was never a need to feed them that well, or provide them with adequate grazing pastures, cause the sheep only knew of what they had. However, some savvy young and wealthy farmers got smart and came to the old farmer with a plan to lease some of the sheep from him, for they found a way to garner wool, or fleece the masses of sheep cheaper and more efficiently than the old farmer could. It would cut down the old farmers cost to feed the sheep, and really the farmer was just getting to old to be running after those sheep anyway. So, the savvy young wealthy farmers lured those better sheep away with the promise of greener pastures, and made it more glamorous like all entities do by touting its virtues and limiting accessibility to it, for only a few sheep were chosen every so often with the promise of greener pastures. Well, what poor old sheep could refuse the prospects of greener pastures? Although shepherds from the northern lands of Cambridge had come and found that the grass really isn’t at all greener, than the old farmers pastures. However, sheep don’t read, especially reports in peer reviewed shepherds journals, so the sheep remained dumb and hopeful that they would one day graze on lush grass beside the still waters. Well, one day the old farmer, snuck out with his new earnings from the savvy young farmers and lost all his money gambling in a game called “swaps”, and didn’t even have enough money to tend to his old sheep anymore. Well, the man who owned the land, a shrewd land owner like most in his profession had been waiting for an opportunity like this, and he knew this was his lucky break. He saw how easy it was for those young savvy farmers to take the sheep off the old farmers hands and how dumb those sheep were to think there was such thing for them as greener pastures; for the land owner owned all the land and knew, the truly green pastures and still waters weren’t ever for sheep to occupy. But the landowner said to himself; now, I could give the old farmer the money to hold his sheep over till he gets back on his feet, or I can let him starve, make him sell cheap and start divvying up his farm land and make myself and my farming partners rich. After all what did God make sheep for but to get fleeced, and he created those like the land owner to always live upon the greenest pastures. He knew there was no sense in that old drunk farmer keeping all those sheep tied to himself. Besides, he wasn’t taking that good care of them anyway. So the land owner withheld any help to that old farmer. The old farmer figured he was never a good farmer anyway. He might as well sell all these remaining sheep and retire to the rolling hills of Wynnefield which lay at the south gate of the land of greener pastures and still waters. These of the greenest pastures were the lands of Radnor and Merion where all the land owners and their savvy farmer friends and family lived. Now the old farmer was weak and didn’t have to much energy to corral all those sheep. As a matter of fact, all of those years as a sheep farmer, and being a sheep himself, he came to distain the very smell of them and didn’t want much else to do with sheep anymore. So, he called an old shepherd, a great sheep Herder from Prince Georges County to come round up the remainder of his sheep so he could go and sell those remaining to his land owner and retire. Now the shepherd from Maryland was efficient and had a “Master Plan” for closing up the old stables and rounding up the sheep for the farmer so they could be sold to the land owner. Soon, he thought; the new farmers will come and divvy up all the remaining sheep in the few remaining stables and sheer them and feed them for less money at a profit. Now, one might ask; what happened to all those sheep so long ago who left the fold, who thought the grass was greener? Well, the newly purchased sheep joined them, crowded the stables once again, and now they’re all getting fed half the rations, and some must walk twice the distance to get fed. The old farmer retired and thanked God he never had to smell the scent of sheep again. The savvy young farmers consolidated and made one great stable and lowered their sheep provisions cost even further, and the land owner remains perched in the green green pastures keeping an eye out for any tragedy he might turn a profit on. In the end all things were as they always were. Landowners continue to buy and sell the land, farmers continue to reap from it, and the sheep? Well, we all know sheep are born to be fleeced.
Submitted by Annoy (not verified) on February 9, 2013 11:32 am
The Performing Arts Charter school, a predominantly white K-8 school in far South Philly, was given an expansion of their charter last year. They not only are increasing enrollment at their K-8 but were given a 1400 seat high school. Word is they will open in a closed Catholic school in South Philly. Weren't they told to expand to north Philly which does not have performing arts schools? South Philly already has 4 charter high schools (Audenreid which was given to Universal, Prep Charter, Mastery Thomas and PET - while in Center City is full of the east side of south Philly students). There are also district schools - CAPA, GAMP, Academy at Palumbo (which has a full music program), Furness, Southern, and Bok (yes, which might end up at Souther). There is NO need for another high school in South Philly no less one for performing arts. Why is this school - which does not reflect the demographics of South Philly and has NO experience with a high school - being allowed to open a high school in South Philly? Why is being allowed to open a high school when high schools are being closed? Enough already!!!
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on February 10, 2013 8:14 pm
I'm confused. There are no times assigned to defend specific schools. Who gets to decide which 10 people speak for each school? It is first come first served? Not a policy that works when there is a lot of interest. They have to start a lottery to see who will get to speak? If your school is in the North Central region, do you just get to pick one of those times that is convenient for you to show up?? This schedule does not make much sense and there does not seem to be any process. What about the meetings this week at just a handful of schools? Also, the SRC meeting is at 4 pm on Thursday, Feb. 21st and the hearings start at 6 pm?
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on February 11, 2013 10:03 am
Seriously?!??! SDP expects people to be in center city waiting to testify or participate in a meeting between 8:30 - 10:00 PM?? Whose going to work 8 hours, fight rush hour to get downtown, find parking, wait til 8:30 or later than get home and get ready for work/school the next day? Why not have the meeting go til midnght? For that matter, why have the meeting at all? It will be sparsely attended yet will count as a 'community meeting' on the matter. Why not schedule a meeting Saturday, Feb. 16th? Yes it's short notice but offers a better opportunity for attendance. This is a very important issue but realistically, attendance at a meeting after 8pm is as not likely. It's hard enough for working people to get to a meeting between 4:30 & 7:00pm. Just a thought.

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