Menu
Paid Advertisement
view counter

For laid-off Philly teachers, it's a mix of waiting, hoping and leaving

Laid-off teacher Bernadette McHenry will spend her summer teaching Upward Bound classes at the University of Pennsylvania. After that, she's not sure what direction her teaching career will take. (Emma Lee/for NewsWorks)

by Kelly Lawlor for NewsWorks

Even after last week's deal in the Pennsylvania legislature to help the Philadelphia School District, 3,800 teachers and support staff laid off in June still do not know whether they will be back at work in the fall.

Those teachers and staff now face the choice of waiting to see whether they can stay with the District, or diving into the job market.

The last time Anissa Weinraub was laid off, she was rehired to her position as a Philadelphia high school English teacher. She's planning on waiting again this time, while continuing to advocate for Philadelphia schools and students.

"This is really true of a lot of teachers in the School District," said Weinraub.  "We're really committed to a system that sometimes doesn't feel like it's really committed to us. And so for better or for worse, a lot of us will wait it out."

Read the rest of this story at NewsWorks

view counter

Comments (15)

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on July 12, 2013 2:06 pm
Wait it out, indeed. Wait to see if your brethren will do what is necessary so you may have a chance of getting your job back. Don't hold your breath.
Submitted by Dan Fitzsimmons (not verified) on July 12, 2013 3:37 pm
If they're not hiring back staff with the money that they're getting from the city and state then what are they doing with it?
Submitted by lmm324 (not verified) on July 12, 2013 4:04 pm
Answer - Lining their own pockets like pay raises for the top administrators.
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on July 12, 2013 4:30 pm
They're using it to plug the $300 million PSD budget gap. They borrowed $300 Million last year and they can't do that every year. What planet have you been on?
Submitted by Dan Fitzsimmons (not verified) on July 12, 2013 4:25 pm
Obviously, you have been duped by the system and been led to believe what they tell you. The budget was passed without this extra money in it from the city and the state. There is not a hole in the current budget that is waiting for this money. The budget, as it stands now, is breaking even. The new money coming in from the city and the state is in addition to the already approved SRC budget (the bare bones budget), it's not coming in to cover the already approved budget. It's new money coming in to be able to keep services and staff that had been cut. Which, to me, means that they should be hiring people back that have been laid off with it, because, really, what else would they do with it?
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on July 12, 2013 5:10 pm
You're living in a delusional fantasy world. Better get to a psychiatrist while you still have healthcare. That "breakeven" budget that was passed assumed $60 Million more from the city, $120 Million in new money from the state, and $133 Million in concessions from the PFT. That's how it was passed. PSD got $70 Million from the city, the state money is still uncertain, and the $133 Million in concessions from the PFT will come next month. SMH.
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on July 12, 2013 8:00 pm
That's actually wrong. The accepted budget was balanced, triggering the 4000 layoffs, etc. No assumptions of additional funding was assumed. The request for more funds was to restore people and services back to the pre-approved budget level. http://webgui.phila.k12.pa.us/root/home/leadership/budget-website
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on July 15, 2013 3:17 am
No it was not. That budget assumed that additional money. The PSD was $300 million in the hole. The PFT will take $133 million in concessions next month. Count on it.
Submitted by anon (not verified) on July 13, 2013 10:39 pm
dude, put down the pipe and stop writing drivel. you're scaring the kids.
Submitted by Iamthe100% (not verified) on July 12, 2013 5:11 pm
Oh, they'll hire back staff, just not the same staff. Manufacturing a fiscal crisis is a great way to create and distribute patronage jobs. For example, administrations, who have no loyalty to those hired by past administrations, cry poor, fire staff, then a few months later hire different people to fill those jobs. This plan is not perfect because certified staff are difficult find. Then again, TFA is recruiting unemployed young people while the school district is desperately trying to eliminate seniority rules. I'm sure this is all just coincidence. Thank goodness the State doesn't create an unfair hiring system. You know, one in which only school districts can apply for emergency certifications for their TFA hires, but the rest of us have to actually go to college as education majors and pass Praxis exams before we teach. Mmm, maybe I should have been a human resources major.
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on July 13, 2013 7:21 pm
No, you should have went to the broad school, and become a principal ...dolt...
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on July 12, 2013 4:16 pm
We're being used as pawns....in the game of the 1%ers
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on July 13, 2013 2:48 pm
Being hired back at a lower salary is something I'd strike over.How dare they? I don't think Jordan would go for that. There may not be any raises (but perhaps bonuses that don't count toward retirement) but a lower salary is unheard of. If employees are asked to kick in some for healthcare you absolutely cannot have a lower salary as well. It has never and will never work that way. How about all the money they are saving in summer benefits from laid off employees? In any event there must be oversight as to where money goes.
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on July 14, 2013 10:07 am
FYI, extending the existing contract without raises is what the budget is based on. While that may seem like a major concession, it wouldn't add any money to the existing budget. They said that any additional money received would FIRST go to receiving schools of the closed schools.
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on July 13, 2013 2:57 pm
"Oh, they'll hire back staff, just not the same staff. Manufacturing a fiscal crisis is a great way to create and distribute patronage jobs. For example, administrations, who have no loyalty to those hired by past administrations, cry poor, fire staff, then a few months later hire different people to fill those jobs. With a ratifed contract in place they cannot just hire willy nilly so to put this all out there confuses those who don't know better.

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.

By using this service you agree not to post material that is obscene, harassing, defamatory, or otherwise objectionable. We reserve the right to delete or remove any material deemed to be in violation of this rule, and to ban anyone who violates this rule. Please see our "Terms of Usage" for more detail concerning your obligations as a user of this service. Reader comments are limited to 500 words. You are fully responsible for the content that you post.

Follow Us On

Read the latest print issue

 

Philly Ed Feed

Become a Notebook member

 

Recent Comments

Top

Public School Notebook

699 Ranstead St.
Third Floor
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Phone: (215) 839-0082
Fax: (215) 238-2300
notebook@thenotebook.org

© Copyright 2013 The Philadelphia Public School Notebook. All Rights Reserved.
Terms of Usage and Privacy Policy