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February 2010 Vol. 17. No. 4 Focus on School Turnarounds

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Waiting for the Renaissance

The District's new plan raises hopes and concerns at 14 low-scoring schools.

By by Bill Hangley Jr. on Feb 2, 2010 03:21 PM
Photo: Harvey Finkle

Stetson Middle School, at B and Allegheny, is one of seven potential Renaissance Schools that were already turned over to an external manager once before, in 2002.

It’s nothing new for Janiece Jones to wonder about the future of her child’s school. 

“It was supposed to be closed down,” she said as she stood in front of the Paul L. Dunbar Elementary School in North Philadelphia. “[Then] they just said that someone was going to try and change the performance of the school.”

The first rumor didn’t come to pass. But the second just might, in potentially dramatic fashion.

Dunbar is one of 14 names on the District’s list of “Renaissance Eligible Schools.” Any one could become an actual Renaissance School, facing what could be a complete transformation next fall – new staff, new principal, longer school days, and extra supports.

But it will be months before Jones finds out who will actually run Dunbar. Any of the 14 could become a charter school, a school run by an external manager or by a new team of District educators, or a so-called “Promise Academy” supervised directly by Superintendent Arlene Ackerman. A few may not become Renaissance Schools at all.

For now, Chief Officer of Charter, Partnership and New Schools Benjamin Rayer says there are some certainties regarding Dunbar’s fate and that of the other schools named.

“Children are not leaving, buildings are not closing,” he said. “But the adults … may change.”

The 14 eligible schools are scattered across the city. All rank among the District’s worst in terms of test scores and other performance measures.

Many have suffered from chronic instability: North Philadelphia’s Frederick Douglass has had seven principals in seven years. West Philadelphia’s University City High has been plagued by rumors of imminent closure. Kensington’s Stetson Middle School was run for years by a private manager, Edison Schools, until the District cancelled the contract, citing lack of progress.

Decisions by May

District officials say that by May, the schools will know their exact fates. Some will see at least half of their staffs replaced, while others could find themselves with entirely new, non-union staffs and administrations.

Meanwhile, principals are preparing for an intense round of in-school evaluations while District staff is seeking applications from qualified charter operators and private organizations interested in running each school.

Soon, potential providers, armed with slide shows promising big improvements, will fan out across the city to discuss with parents details of the proposed school transformations – things like adding more afterschool activities, better links to community groups, and more support for teachers.

The Renaissance plan offers hope to some parents, like Jones.

“I believe it will work. I hope it does,” she said.

But for teachers and administrators at the eligible  schools, the proposal casts them into a new world of uncertainty.

“There are definitely ways I can see this being a wonderful thing for kids. And even for teachers,” said Lisa Kelly, a veteran English teacher at University City High School.

Kelly said she would welcome the kind of stable, community-responsive leadership that the Renaissance plan promises.

“We’ve had nine principals in my 17 years and some of them were taken out of here in disgrace.”

Kelly likes that the Renaissance plan includes extended hours for students and higher pay for teachers. At the same time, she worries that the first product of this new reform would be more instability. 

“My own private hobby horse is that they never give anybody enough time,” she said. “When you try to redo the whole thing, it’s going to look real fuzzy for a long time.”

Matt Malone, a third-year social studies teacher at West Philadelphia High,  shares Kelly’s concerns.

“West really should not have been chosen for this list,” he said.  “We’re already experiencing a renaissance.” 

Malone was one of the first teachers hired by Principal Saliyah Cruz, who was brought in to turn around a school once infamous for fights and fires.

Under her leadership, Malone said West has new AP and honors courses, new partnerships with local universities, and successful afterschool programs. He worries that dramatic changes will cost the school its momentum.

Cruz is more optimistic.

West Philadelphia’s principal recently told the Philadelphia Inquirer, “I think potentially this is a great thing.”

Samuel Daroff Elementary Principal Bonnie Berman also sees opportunity.

“I believe that it is a rebirth of the Daroff School and the surrounding community,” she said.  “Whatever they view as offering children the opportunity to be successful, then that’s the right thing. I have the utmost faith and trust in Dr. Ackerman.”

The task of retaining teachers

Not everyone shares Berman’s faith in the process.

Betsy Wice, a retired Frederick Douglass teacher who now volunteers at the school, said Douglass’s low test scores say more about its challenging community than the quality of its staff. She worries that the coming months of uncertainty will drive the best teachers out.

“I would rate this school, classroom by classroom, as a lot better than a lot of public schools, even though the scores won’t reflect that,” Wice said.

“We’ve had teachers who have been demeaned for low test scores, they end up at Masterman, and all of a sudden they’re wonderful because their kids’ test scores are so high. I see that all the time.”

About the Author

Bill Hangley Jr. is a freelance writer based in West Philadelphia. Temple University student and Notebook intern Michelle Welk contributed to this article.

Comments (1)

Submitted by Vinicius (not verified) on February 6, 2010 4:40 pm

Don't let the neo-cons running large urban school districts fool you. They are making it up as they go along.

Read the 2009 technical report with benchmarks to judge school district leaders on how they are or are not making the grade.

Keep these clowns honest by reading this report.

United States Is Substantially Behind Other Nations in Providing Teacher Professional Development That Improves Student Learning; Report Identifies Practices that Work

http://www.srnleads.org/press/prs/nsdc_profdev.html

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