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School-by-school graduation rates

4-year cohort graduation rate for first-time 9th graders from fall 2007

By Anonymous on Feb 3, 2012 12:31 PM

District Schools

Grad Rate
GAMP 100%
Masterman 100%
Central 95%
Science Leadership Academy 95%
Lankenau 95%
CAPA 94%
Constitution 94%
Motivation 93%
Bodine 93%
Girls 91%
Academy at Palumbo 91%
Engineering and Science 90%
Parkway Center City 89%
Swenson 86%
HS for Business & Tech 85%
Saul 85%
Parkway Northwest 85%
Robeson – Human Services 83%
Parkway West 83%
Randolph 81%
Military Acad – Elverson 81%
Military Acad – Leeds 79%
Mastbaum 78%
Dobbins 78%
Washington 74%
Northeast 72%
Lamberton 70%
Bok 70%
Communications Tech 68%
Rhodes 66%
Franklin 66%
Carroll 63%
School of the Future 61%
Douglas 60%
Strawberry Mansion 60%
Roxborough 58%
Sayre 57%
Gratz 56%
Overbrook 56%
Vaux 54%
Lincoln 54%
FitzSimons 53%
King 51%
Fels 51%
Frankford 50%
Furness 49%
Bartram 49%
William Penn (closed) 48%
Kensington Culinary 47%
University City 45%
Kensington CAPA 45%
West Philadelphia 44%
Olney West 43%
Germantown 42%
South Philadelphia 41%
Kensington Business 39%
Edison 38%
Olney East 37%
   
Charter Schools Grad Rate
MaST - Math, Science & Tech 91%
Architecture and Design 90%
Math, Civics & Sciences 88%
Franklin Towne 88%
Philadelphia Academy 88%
New Media Tech 83%
Prep - Math, Sci Tech & Careers  83%
Delaware Valley 80 80%
Nueva Esperanza Academy 77%
Mastery at Shoemaker 75%
Boys’ Latin of Philadelphia 75%
Mastery at Thomas 72%
Phila Electrical Tech 72%
Imhotep Institute 71%
Leadership Learning 71%
Mastery – Lenfest 69%
Community Academy of Phila 68%
Maritime Academy 68%
Freire 66%
Multi-Cultural Academy 65%
Mariana Bracetti 63%
Hope 58%
Truebright Science Academy 57%
World Communications 53%
   
Alternative Schools Grad Rate
CEP Behavioral Adjustment Ctr 30%
Camelot – Woodhaven 25%
CEP – Miller 15%
CEP- Hunting Park 14%
Camelot – Boone 13%
RETI-WRAP 11%
Source: School District of Philadelphia (.XLS version)

Understanding the rates

There are many different ways of calculating graduation rates. These four-year cohort graduation rates provided by the School District were calculated by tracking a group of first-time freshman from fall 2007 (the cohort) through their high school years and measuring what percentage earned their diploma by fall 2011.

Under the School District’s system, students count as graduates or dropouts at the schools where they enrolled for the first time as 9th graders, even if they transferred to other schools in the District. Students who leave the District (for example, move to another city) are excluded from the rate calculations.

The state calculates the cohort graduation rate in a different way in measuring adequate yearly progress. Graduates are attributed to the school where they finished rather than the school where they started high school.

Comments (9)

Submitted by Michelle (not verified) on March 15, 2012 8:58 pm

Looking at these numbers, the charter schools are not all that impressive. Most of the schools with the worst graduation rates are neighborhood schools whereas most of the charter high schools are lottery based. Thus, there is going to be some selection bias there. And the top high schools are SDP schools!

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Submitted by Meg (not verified) on March 21, 2012 11:44 am

But what about Philadelphia's transient rates? Does a graduating senior support the percentages in his final school or the one her enrolled in the first September?

Submitted by Meg (not verified) on March 21, 2012 1:16 pm

I see the last line in the article... how/ why does a graduate only apply to the last school they are in.... so if they transfer out in the last year - the school they start in, that gets them on the right path gets no credit. This is not fair.

Submitted by lfrickey (not verified) on November 11, 2012 10:49 am
Student engagement is key to student success. The Scale of Student Engagement/Disengagement (SOS ED), developed to identify student engagement levels that puts students at risk of not graduating high school, is quick, inexpensive, and easy to administer. It uses a paper-pen, bubble-sheet format, and solicits student feedback on research-identified indicators that place student at risk in school. The SOS ED can be administered to 6th through 12th graders and in a university study demonstrated high validity and reliability in identifying levels of student engagement. The SOS ED is created on the premise that all students can engage to achieve student success and if they do not, we, as educators, need to know the cause of the disengagement. To see how the SOS ED works, please watch this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1BbJQRyoGY and visit www.scaleofstudentengagement.com or email me lfrickey@scaleofstudentengagement.com Dr. Lynn Frickey
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