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Philadelphia Futures celebrates 25 years of graduates

By Michaela Ward on Jun 8, 2015 03:12 PM

When asked why he wants to go to college, Anthony Williams has a simple answer. 

“My goal is to make something of myself," said Williams, a soon-to-be graduate of Bodine High School and the Philadelphia Futures Sponsor-A-Scholar program.

City Council candidates' views on education: Jenné Ayers

By thenotebook on Apr 27, 2015 12:25 PM

On May 19, Philadelphians will hit the polls to winnow the field of City Council at-large candidates. Out of 28 declared candidates, only seven will be elected in November (including at least two from a minority party). Each party can run five candidates in the general election. The Notebook reached out to the candidates, asking their opinions on the election's most gripping issue: education.

Where do candidates stand on the School Reform Commission's decision to approve five new charter school applications? Whose job is it to find more money for public schools, the city's or the District's? Absent an agreement with the teachers' union, do they think the SRC is right to pursue concessions through the courts? And finally, what ideas do they have for how the District can fix its financial problems?

Notes from the news, April 27

By thenotebook on Apr 27, 2015 08:51 AM

In a time of austerity, Title I changes cause consternation in schools. Notebook

Candidates ignore city's biggest issue: Pensions. Inquirer

Mayoral debate covers cops, kangaroos, Chip Kelly. Daily News

Is Jim Kenney a True Progressive? Philadelphia Magazine

Officials Suggest Not As Many Parents Opting Their Kids Out Of PARCC Tests As Originally Thought. CBSPhilly

A shuttered school finds new life as art. Inquirer

Shared costs of Pa. community college shift primarily to students. NewsWorks

School-choice advocacy group plans big TV push. Inquirer 

How To Turn Around A Failing School. The Philadelphia Citizen 

Penn Relays serve as touchstone for former high stars. Inquirer

With scant resources, some Philly schools manage to maintain libraries' quiet and quality. NewsWorks

Officials Say One Philadelphia Public School Played Favorites With Enrollments. CBSPhilly

History Class On The Road For Group Of Philadelphia Sixth Graders. CBSPhilly 

Area Schoolkids Compete in Underwater Robotics Challenge. CBSPhilly

Report finds few colleges have a Shakespeare requirement. AP

Philly rolls out bike share program near campus. The Daily Pennsylvanian 

Remembering Edward Robinson, Philadelphia's Great Champion of African Consciousness. Philadelphia Magazine

News Summary from Keystone State Education Coalition


Who's hiring teachers for 2015 in Philly? For education job postings, visit jobs.thenotebook.org

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Lecture explores why racial literacy should begin in schools

By Samuel Reed III on Apr 14, 2015 12:39 PM

Earlier this month, Penn held its annual lecture named after Constance Clayton, Philadelphia's first Black superintendent. The title of the lecture was "Do Black and Brown Lives Matter? Reframing Public Media Racial Narratives for Urban Schooling." Addressing that issue was Dr. James Peterson, director of Africana studies and an associate professor of English at Lehigh University.

Peterson, a leading hip-hop scholar who regularly appears as a media contributor on MSNBC and other media networks, spoke about why the Black Lives Matter movement means so much for organizing and transforming classrooms and communities. Educational institutions, he said, should be at the forefront of unpacking the issues of systemic inequities found in schools, police departments, and other areas of civic life.

Filmmakers to bring film, discussion of college access to Philly

By David Limm on Apr 7, 2015 12:08 PM

To be the first in a family to attend college is a breakthrough moment that can help secure a student's financial future and end a cycle of poverty. But for many low-income students, the process proves too foreign, the hurdles too high to overcome.

Only a fair tax system will fully fund Pa. public schools

By Bishop Dwayne Royster on Mar 12, 2015 01:21 PM

A week after Gov. Wolf’s budget address, we’re seeing reactions from all sides to the governor’s proposal -- some celebratory and some critical.

Members of POWER (Philadelphians Organized to Witness, Empower and Rebuild), an interfaith organization that has prioritized the fight for full funding for our schools, have been watching this debate as it unfolds and assessing what it means for our children. As people of faith committed to a prophetic critique of “the world as it is,” we must speak truth about what is being left unsaid. When it comes to the funding of our schools, economic inequality and education inequality in Pennsylvania are intertwined -- and we are not moving fast enough to fix it.  

City Council candidates' views on education: Isaiah Thomas

By the Notebook on Mar 11, 2015 02:25 PM

On May 19, Philadelphians will hit the polls to winnow the field of City Council at-large candidates. Out of 28 declared candidates, only seven will be elected in November (including at least two from a minority party). Each party can run five candidates in the general election. The Notebook reached out to the candidates, asking their opinions on the election's most gripping issue: education.

Where do candidates stand on the School Reform Commission's decision to approve five new charter school applications? Whose job is it to find more money for public schools, the city's or the District's? Absent an agreement with the teachers' union, do they think the SRC is right to pursue concessions through the courts? And finally, what ideas do they have for how the District can fix its financial problems?

Sustainable community schools: An alternative to privatization

By Ron Whitehorne on Mar 9, 2015 12:02 PM

Public education is at a crossroads in Philadelphia. An aggressive and well-funded charter school lobby wants to rapidly expand the city’s already sizable charter sector.   

Lavish campaign contributions have secured political support in the Republican-dominated state legislature and from mayoral candidate Anthony Williams here in Philadelphia. A well-oiled public relations and media operation has crafted a narrative about children trapped in failing schools and the thousands of families on waiting lists for charters. 

The reality of understaffed, poorly resourced public schools destabilized by punitive and largely ineffective school transformation policies has driven many families to seek refuge in charters, few of which perform better than the schools they left. The charter lobby ignores the fact that charter school expansion, given the present charter school law and the absence of additional funding in the form of a charter school reimbursement line in the state budget, can only come at the expense of children in traditional public schools. 

Rendell Center for civic education moving to Annenberg at Penn

By Dale Mezzacappa on Mar 6, 2015 03:02 PM

In a move designed to beef up civics education in schools, the Rendell Center for Civics & Civic Engagement will relocate to the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania.

The Rendell Center, led by Judge Marjorie O. Rendell of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, focuses on civics education for the younger grades, while Annenberg has concentrated on middle and upper grades.

Study investigates high discipline rates among Black girls

By Camden Copeland on Mar 6, 2015 12:34 PM

Black girls are disciplined at higher rates and with harsher consequences than their White counterparts, according to a new report from Columbia Law School's Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies.

The study, called Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underpotected, compares 2011-12 data on out-of-school suspensions, expulsions, and school-related arrests for White and Black girls in New York City and Boston, and explains the adverse consequences of the disparities.

The data showed that in Boston, Black girls are 11 times more likely to be disciplined than White girls and 12 times more likely to be suspended. In New York City, Black girls were 10 times more likely to be disciplined and 10 times more likely to be suspended than White girls.

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