Menu
Paid Advertisement
view counter

Stories tagged: budget cuts

SRC won't adopt 'Doomsday II' budget

By Dale Mezzacappa on May 29, 2014 06:07 PM

Updated | 11:30 p.m.

The School Reform Commission declined Thursday to adopt a budget proposal that would raise class sizes as high as 41, cut 800 teachers, reduce special education services to their bare minimum, prevent all but the most basic building maintenance, and make further cuts in services like counselors and nurses.

The SRC made the decision even though failing to adopt a budget before the end of May violates the city charter.

"Rather than adopting a 'Doomsday II' budget – and give anyone the impression that the cuts it contains are feasible or acceptable – we are going to not act on the budget tonight," announced SRC Chairman Bill Green. "Instead, we will continue to focus our energy and attention on securing the needed funding for our schools."

Why do schoolchildren suddenly die?

By Eileen DiFranco on May 23, 2014 06:26 PM

In my twenty-four years as a school nurse, I’ve called quite a few parents about all sorts of problems.  There was the boy who dislocated his shoulder while hanging from the doorjamb and the boy who fractured his jaw. There was the little girl with the hundred and four degree temperature and the girl with the nosebleed we simply could not stop.  I’ve called about seizures, asthma attacks, and lacerations needing stitches. Each time I’ve called the parent- even if I’ve called 911- I try to reassure the parents by saying, “Your baby is ok, but I’ve called 911 because….”

Schools have emergency procedures; not all have defibrillators or staff trained in CPR

By Dale Mezzacappa on May 23, 2014 01:07 PM

Accounts of the collapse of a 7-year-old boy at Jackson Elementary School on Wednesday say that at least two first responders -- a library volunteer who was a retired nurse and an employee of a behavioral health organization trained in CPR -- were not regular staffers and just happened to be in the building.

That raises the question of whether Jackson had in place an emergency plan required by the state departments of Health and Education that identifies "specially trained" staff and specifies staff responsibilities. 

"In true emergency situations, the school should do all in its power to render emergency care," say the guidelines. "To prepare for emergencies that can be reasonably anticipated in the student population, the school should have written first aid policies and emergency management practices in place. These policies and procedures should reflect staff responsibilities and district expectations for staff action in an emergency situation, including identifying specially trained and designated individuals who, in addition to the nurse, will render first aid."

District officials plead again with City Council for funds to avert a new round of layoffs

By Dale Mezzacappa on May 21, 2014 10:51 PM

City Council summoned School District leadership Wednesday to answer more questions on the needs of the schools and to argue over what the city can and should provide.

But after three hours of sharp verbal sparring, they seemed no closer to a breakthrough that could get the District enough money in time to avoid triggering hundreds of layoffs and planning for class sizes in September of 40 students or more.

Henry School community talks with mayor about impact of budget cuts

By thenotebook on May 15, 2014 10:48 AM

by Neema Roshania for NewsWorks

Seventh grader Jared Taylor often volunteers to stay after school to straighten desks and sweep his classroom and the hallways. It's a tough choice because it leaves his younger sister, a 3rd grader, waiting for him outside the Carpenter Lane institution.

He cares about C.W. Henry School — the Mount Airy K-8 he's attended since kindergarten — and recent budget cuts have often left the school messy. 

Public not happy with District budget scenarios

By Paul Jablow on May 1, 2014 11:47 AM

As the angry crowd of parents, principals, teachers, and other public education advocates filed out of Wednesday night’s School Reform Commission budget hearing, SRC Chair Bill Green gave a capsule summary of what he said moments earlier.

“It’s immoral what’s happening to the students,” he said. “It’s unfair what’s happening to the teachers.”

The two-hour hearing on the District’s 2014-15 school budget included a grim presentation of the District’s financial picture by Chief Financial Officer Matthew J. Stanski and a flood of critical testimony, mostly from parents and educators.

Bartram's troubles: Not about funds?

By Bill Hangley Jr. on Apr 16, 2014 05:36 PM

As news of violence and disarray at Bartram High School dominated Philadelphia headlines, national education researchers were downtown at the Convention Center, discussing the theory and practice of a “portfolio” school reform strategy that relies on management changes – converting low-performing schools to charters or closing them.

And although many have tied Bartram’s troubles to the budget cuts that sharply reduced staff levels at the school, Philadelphia School Partnership head Mark Gleason does not agree.

School counselors struggle to help seniors with college plans

By thenotebook on Dec 23, 2013 10:39 AM

by Kevin McCorry for NewsWorks

As application deadlines loom for many of the nation's top colleges, guidance counselors in Philadelphia's traditional public high schools are scrambling to ensure that the needs of all students are met.

According to Philly School Counselors United, staff shortages due to budget cuts have made the undertaking "frantic" for counselors and a "struggle" for the School District's seniors.

Christine Donnelly is the only guidance counselor for the Academy at Palumbo's more than 800 students.

The case of Laporshia Massey: Asthma and our schools

By thenotebook on Dec 3, 2013 04:07 PM

I’ve been a school nurse in Philadelphia for almost 25 years. I’ve seen lots of blood and a finger almost amputated by a door accidentally slammed. I’ve seen head injuries, seizures, and high and low blood sugar levels in diabetics. 

The very worst moments I’ve experienced as a school nurse, however, are those that were spent with children who were having an asthma attack.

No relief in sight for District’s troubled finances

By thenotebook on Nov 25, 2013 03:02 PM

This story will appear in the Notebook's forthcoming print edition focusing on school funding, due out on Dec. 2.

 

Nearly three months into the school year, the School District of Philadelphia is still navigating treacherous fiscal waters, having made little progress in convincing state and city lawmakers to provide financial relief and stability.

Faced with a $304 million budget gap for this fiscal year, the District had sought $180 million in new revenues from the state and city and $133 million in labor concessions. As of mid-November, it had received $112 million in increases from the state and city, but just $17 million of that is in recurring funds. And it had reached no agreement with its unions.

As a result, it is still operating schools with shrunken staffs, sparse instructional materials, inadequate counseling services for students, and classes at their contractual maximum. 

Philly Ed Feed

Print edition

Click Here
view counter
Click Here - Paid Ad
view counter
Click Here
view counter
Universal Family of School is Recruiting Talented Teachers
view counter

view counter
Click Here
view counter
Keystone State Education Coalition
view counter
Click Here
view counter
Click here
view counter
Advertise with TheNotebook.org
view counter
Click Here
view counter
Reserve your ad in the next edition of The Notebook
view counter
Top

Public School Notebook

699 Ranstead St.
Third Floor
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Phone: (215) 839-0082
Fax: (215) 238-2300
notebook@thenotebook.org

© Copyright 2013 The Philadelphia Public School Notebook. All Rights Reserved.
Terms of Usage and Privacy Policy