December 10 — 12:58 pm, 2003

Access to certified, experienced teachers is not equal for all

A look at the data shows that where public school students in Philadelphia live and attend school impacts the likelihood they will have an experienced, certified teacher. Students who attend schools with high poverty levels or with many students of color have more teachers who are new to teaching and fewer teachers who are certified. Higher rates of teacher turnover at these schools exacerbate the problem. For more analysis and information about the problem and the School District’s response, see “Teacher quality gap persists across District.”

 

The least experienced teachers are most likely to be found in Kensington, North Philadelphia and West Philadelphia schools.

 

These graphs are based on data from Once and for all: Placing a highly qualified teacher in every Philadelphia classroom, released in September 2003 by Research for Action, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization. The report is part of Learning from Philadelphia’s School Reform, a research and public awareness project designed to assess the effectiveness of key local education reforms. The report is available online at here or by calling 215-823-2500, x508.

 

Schools with the most students of color have more teachers who are not fully certified, and the gap has widened.

 

Schools with the highest poverty levels have more teachers who are not fully certified, and the gap has widened.

 

Schools with the highest poverty levels have the least experienced teachers.

 

Schools with the highest poverty levels have the most teacher turnover, losing almost half their teachers within three years.

 

 

 

 

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