April 3 — 10:14 am, 2015

Event offers a frank talk on how city officials can help solve District problems

A panel of longtime Philadelphia public school supporters will be speaking next week about the problems facing the District and what the 2015 mayor and City Council candidates can do to solve them.

The event, called GetSchoolED: An Insider’s Look at Education and the 2015 Election, will feature a panel of influential voices in local education. It will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 8, at the Skyline Room at the Free Library of Philadelphia’s main branch.

The panel will include former interim District CEO Phil Goldsmith, Mayor’s Office of Education Chief Education Officer Lori Shorr, former State Rep. Tony Payton, and former City Council staffer Justin DiBerardinis. All mayoral and City Council candidates and their campaign staffs are invited to attend the panel.

This panel provides an opportunity for the public to learn about the mayor and City Council’s ability to affect schools. Topics will include the discord among Philadelphia officials and education advocates, which officials can enact real change, and what tools the general public can use to improve city schools. The objective is to illuminate the nuances of the relationships of those who influence city schools and to highlight the ways that public officials can work effectively to improve the school system.

The event will be hosted by PhillyCORE Leaders. The Coalition of Rising Education Leaders connects rising leaders who are making an impact on Philadelphia education. The event is sponsored by the Committee of Seventy, Young Involved Philadelphia, Pattison Leader Group, New Leaders Council  Philadelphia, the Notebook, and The Next Mayor 2015, a collaboration among city media organizations.

Drinks and discussion will follow the panel at Kite and Key,1836 Callowhill St.

Tickets are available through April 8.

 

Camden Copeland is an intern at the Notebook.

 

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